Catalysis Science & Technology

ACS 2017 Graduate Student Travel Award Winners

Congratulations to the following graduate students who are recipients of the 2017 ACS Graduate Student Travel Award:

  • Yawei Li (Drexel Unversity)
  • Yubing Lu (Virginia Polytechnic Institute)
  • Susan Citrak (University of California Sana Cruz)
  • Walter Thomas Ralston (University of California Berkeley)
  • Zhiyuan Qi (Iowa State University)
  • Yuchen Pei (Iowa State University)
  • James Hunns (Aston University)
  • Kyoung-Won Park (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
  • Cameron J. Bodenschatz (Clemson University)
  • Michael Cordon (Purdue University)
  • Ravi Joshi (Purdue University)
  • Trenton Wilke (University of Michigan)
  • Rong (Rocky) Ye (University of California Berkeley)
  • Lynza Sprowl (Oregon State University)
  • Radhika Rao (Iowa State University)
  • Victor Fung (University of California Riverside)
  • Megan E. Witzke (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign)
  • Linh Bui (University of Minnesota)
  • Ryan Frederick (Oregon State University)

Paul Chirik: Winner of 2017 ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science

Professor Paul Chirik of Princeton University is the recipient of the 2017 ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science in recognition of his contributions to catalysis with first row transition metal complexes that have had a significant impact on catalytic chemistry in the last decade, especially with approaches utilizing “redox-active” ligands to allow the first row metals to catalyze multi-electron chemical transformations. A symposium in Chirik’s honor will be held at the Fall 2017 ACS National Meeting in Washington, DC. Co-sponsored by the ACS Division of Catalysis Science and Technology and the ACS Publications journal ACS Catalysis, the Lectureship honors current groundbreaking research that enables better understanding of catalysis and also advances the field of catalysis as a whole.

Matthias Beller: Winner of 2016 ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science

Professor Matthias Beller of the Leibniz Institute for Catalysis at the University of Rostock in Germany won the 2016 ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science in recognition of his significant contributions in both molecular and heterogeneous catalysis, including his role in the resurgence of iron catalysis for reduction reactions. A symposium in Beller’s honor will be held at the Fall 2017 ACS National Meeting in Washington, DC. Cosponsored by the ACS Division of Catalysis Science & Technology and the ACS Publications journal ACS Catalysis, the Lectureship honors current groundbreaking research that enables better understanding of the links among the various subdisciplines of catalysis and also advances the field of catalysis as a whole.

Suljo Linic, Distinguished Winner of the 2014
ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science

Co-sponsored by the ACS Division of Catalysis Science & Technology and the ACS Publications journal ACS Catalysis, the Lectureship honors the contributions of an individual or a collaborative team for groundbreaking research that strengthens connections between catalysis subdisciplines and has a profound impact on catalysis as a whole. The 2014 ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science will be presented at the Fall 2014 ACS National Meeting in San Francisco, California. Read more about this year's winner here.

Winner of the 2013 ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science

ACS Catalysis and the ACS Division of Catalysis Science & Technology are pleased to announce that Professor John Hartwig, the Henry Rapoport Professor of Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley has won the 2013 ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science, in recognition of his many and varied recent achievements.

Dr. Hartwig’s research team has, in recent years, made important synthetic and mechanistic advances in a wide range of organic and catalytic reactions, including asymmetric allylic substitution, intermolecular hydroaminations of unactivated alkenes, and enantioselective as well as high-throughput methods for catalyst and reaction discovery. Few researchers throughout history have impacted such a wide range of catalytic reactions while studying them with such depth and intellectual rigor as John Hartwig.

As he has throughout his independent research career, John Hartwig continues to break new ground while studying a vast array of reactions catalyzed by transition metal complexes. His achievements both in synthetic chemistry and mechanistic study, particular those advances in catalytic amination and borylation, have proven highly influential on modern catalytic chemistry, and his advances are closely followed in both organic synthesis and organometallic chemistry.

Prior to his 2011 return to UC Berkeley, where he received his PhD in 1990, Prof. Hartwig was an American Cancer Society postdoctoral fellow at MIT, before commencing his independent research career at Yale and then moving to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In 2012, Prof. Hartwig became the youngest synthetic chemist in the National Academy of Sciences. Other awards and honors given in recognition of outstanding research achievements include:

  • Herbert C. Brown Award for Creative Research in Synthetic Methods
  • Einstein Fellowship
  • GlaxoSmithKline Scholars Award
  • National Institutes of Health MERIT Award
  • International Association of the Catalysis Societies (IACS) Award
  • Paul N. Rylander Award of the Organic Reactions Catalysis Society
  • Tetrahedron Young Investigator Award in Organic Synthesis

His numerous impressive contributions to catalysis research during recent years make John Hartwig a truly deserving winner of the 2013 ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science.

The 2013 ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science will be presented at the Fall 2013 ACS National Meeting in Indianapolis, Indiana. The Lectureship award winner, Dr. John Hartwig, will receive $3,000 plus travel and lodging costs. In addition, a symposium will be held in his honor.

Distinguished Winners of the 2015 ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science

Drs. Morris Bullock and Daniel DuBois, and the Hydrogen Catalysis Team at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have won the 2015 ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science. Co-sponsored by the ACS Division of Catalysis Science & Technology and the ACS Publications journal ACS Catalysis, the Lectureship honors current groundbreaking research that enables better understanding of the links among the various subdisciplines of catalysis and also advances the field of catalysis as a whole. Read more about the winners here.

Alan Goldman: Winner of 2012 ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science

ACS Catalysis and the ACS Division of Catalysis Science and Technology are please to announce Professor Alan Goldman of Rutgers University as the first recipient of the ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science. Read more about Professor Goldman and his work here.

About the ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science

The ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science honors current groundbreaking research that enables better understanding of the links among the various subdisciplines of catalysis and also advances the field of catalysis as a whole. The lectureship is co-sponsored by the ACS Division of Catalysis Science & Technology and the ACS Publications journal ACS Catalysis. The lectureship may be awarded to an individual or a collaborative research team.